SNJ: T-1950: “Make sure your online accounts get deleted when you die” | Author: Sarah Jacobsson Purewa | Publisher: CNET | #SmitaNairJain #CopyPaste #womenwhocode #womenintech #womenindigital #womenindatascience #thoughtleaders

February 13, 2018 11:36 PM

Make sure your online accounts get deleted when you die

How to really protect your digital legacy.

byMarch 2, 2016 11:00 AM PST

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Sarah Jacobsson Purewal/CNET

 

Not everyone wants to leave this earth with their online accounts being managed by relatives and next-of-kin, or just floating around on the Internet forever. If you’re the kind of person who likes your privacy — even in death — you should probably make some plans to have all of your online and social media accounts nuked when you pass away.

Some services, such as Google and Facebook, let you set up your eventual account deletion before you get anywhere close to death. Other services will keep your account forever unless an immediate family member or the executor of your estate requests it be removed. Here’s how to make sure all your loose ends are tied up, and that nobody ever gets hold of your top-secret/possibly incriminating emails and Twitter direct messages.

Google

Google’s Inactive Account Manager lets you choose what happens to your account when it becomes inactive for a certain period of time. You can set up the Inactive Account Manager to delete your Google account and all products associated with that account, including Gmail, Blogger, AdSense, and YouTube.

To set this up, log in to your Google account and go to this page. You will need to provide Google with a phone number for alerts — Google will send a message to this number before your account times out, so you know your account is about to become inactive. You will then need to select a timeout period (3 months, 6 months, 9 months, one year, 15 months, or 18 months).

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Sarah Jacobsson Purewal/CNET

Then, under Optionally delete account, turn on Delete my account. Click Enable to turn the Inactive Account Manager on, and you’re set. If you fail to log in to your account for the timeout period you selected, Google will delete your Google account and all data associated with it.

Facebook

Facebook is one of few online services that lets you set a legacy contact — someone who can manage parts of your account and memorialize your page — for when you die. Facebook also lets you delete your account when you die (though it doesn’t use inactivity to determine that you’ve passed away).

To make sure your Facebook account is deleted when you die, open Facebook and go to Settings > Security > Legacy Contact. Check the box next to Account Deletion.

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Sarah Jacobsson Purewal/CNET

 

You will see a pop-up box asking if you really want to delete your account in the future. Click Delete After Death and then re-enter your Facebook password to save your changes. Your account will now be deleted when Facebook is notified of your death — this means that if anybody tries to memorialize your page, it will be deleted instead of memorialized.

Editor’s note: This article was originally published on March 2, 2016. It is being republished as part of CNET’s series “Logging Out,” CNET’s look at death in the digital age.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sarah Jacobsson Purewal

CNET CONTRIBUTOR

OCCUPATION: Freelance Writer

MEMBER SINCE: November 16, 2014

WEBSITE: http://www.geeklil.com

Sarah Jacobsson Purewal

A little about me


SHORT BIO: Sarah is a freelance writer and CNET How To blogger. Her main focus is Windows, but she also covers everything from mobile tech to video games to DIY hardware projects. She likes to press buttons and see what happens, so don’t let her near any control panels.

Sarah Jacobsson Purewal is a contributor to CNET and is not an employee of CNET.

TECH INTERESTS: Smart Appliances, Cell Phones, Televisions, Digital Cameras, Tablets, Laptops, Car Tech, Home theater and audio, Software and Apps, How to Tech, Apple news and products, Microsoft news and products, Google news and products, Games and gear, Security, Social tech, Deals, Latest tech news

OS: Windows, Windows Mobile, Mac OS X, iOS, Android

Publisher (Source): Make sure your online accounts get deleted when you die – CNET 

Disclosure: Smita Nair Jain doesn’t own stock in any publicly traded companies. She has equivalent of the American 401(k) plan in India that is automatically managed.

Disclaimer: The opinions, beliefs and viewpoints expressed by the various author(s), publisher(s) and forum participant(s) on this web site do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs and viewpoints of the @SmitaNairJain or official policies of the #SmitaNairJain 

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